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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
in boston. no american official knew where he was. it's hard to prove negatives but we have 6000 documents from the bin laden compound that have been translated. if there's there is a smoking gun, proving official pakistani passivity operations are not so good that we would not pointed out publicly at this point. >> the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no morew more than they say. but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] there is no evidence i have seen that there was high-level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know you can be a accused of and confidence in this was a domestic issue but that is a different question than we are talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence that they knew that he was there during that time. >> one quick follow up, al qaeda tried to kill general musharraf. al qaeda was at war with the pakistani state and the pakistani state is quite helpful with the operational commander of 9/11. we have had pakistani help reticular
use on the fbi's most wanted list. is responsible for 20 murders in boston. no american official knew what he was. there's no evidence to suggest that. it's hard to prove negligence but with 6000 doctors from the bin laden compound that has been transited if it was a smoking gun i would be interested in ambassador munter's observation. if there was a smoking gun, our observation on oscar we would not a pointed it out publicly at this point. >> you know, the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no more than they say. [laughter] but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] >> know, there is now evidence that i've seen that there was high level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know, you can be accused of incompetence and this was a domestic issue for the pakistan military and intelligence but that's a different question than we're talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence a new he was there during the time. >> al qaeda tried to kill general musharra
killed in an gauzy by ignoring sharia law. joining me now, andrew boston, the author of the new book, sharia versus freedom, the legacy of islamic totalitarianism. it is great to have you with us. we appreciate it. let's start with, first, the idea that sharia law, a lot of people this message saying it is a cultural aspect of the islamic life that poses no threat to america. your thoughts. >> sharia is really foundational in islamic societies. it is derived from the text of islam, the traditions of mohammad demanded has many ritual aspects that might be similar to other religions demand but it is also an entire political system. and here is where it runs afoul of modern human rights concepts like our bill of rights, the universal declaration of human rights. it includes a timeless war doctrine. it also rejects basic human freedoms like freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and it imposes discriminatory regulation, legal regulations against non muslim minorities and women. also includes dehumanizing punishments are well we would consider dehumanizing punishments like flashing for
>> chris from boston up way too early taking care of my wife after she completed her 25th marathon in four hours yesterday. >> chris from boston? >> chris from boston. >> congratulations. >> justin writes, i have a 3 1/2-month-old great dane puppy that is up. >> my dog is perfect. he's cajun. he's a rescue. we have a rescue named emma, too. she's so sweet comment when joe gets near her, she lashes out. thanks. "morning joe" starts right now. >> so you're saying i have no sound bite? good morning, my friends. it's monday, november 19th. welcome to "morning joe." next three hours will change your life and, also, i think may reverse male pattern baldness for half our viewers. >> in fleming. >> yes. i have no idea. what did you just say? >> this show is slimming. >> okay. with us onset, senior political analyst and national editor for new york magazine. msnbc political analyst and former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst, steve ratner. in washington, chief foreign affairs correspondent and host "andrea mitchell reports," andrea mitchell. >> happy monday. go redskins.
in chicago. governor romney in boston. we'll take you there live in a moment. we are getting information on why they vote the way they are. martha maccallum will cover that for us. >> reporter: they are analyzing the response as they come out of the polling places tonight. there are key states like ohio and virginia. the polls are still open for hours as people come home from work and continue to vote. so many areas we haven't heard from yet. what we can tell you for sure so far is that this is a very tight race tonight. let's start with the national poll question. direction of the country. are we on the right track or the wrong track? it's evenly divided. those saying we are on the right direction and going for president obama, no surprise there. 52%, though, say we are headed in the wrong direction. they are backing governor romney. now voters are split on whether the economy is getting better or worse. huge question tonight for everyone, of course. you have about four out of ten states getting better. three of ten say it's getting worse. three of ten says it stays the same for them. s
romney's campaign apparently was planning an election niegts fireworks show over boston harbor as part of a victory celebration. the boston globe reports the romney campaign contracted with the same firm that handles boston's fourth of july fireworks and obtained a permit. but of course they ended up with nothing to celebrate. >>> a dramatic moment in a tucson courtroom today. the former congresswoman, gabrielle giffords, stares down the man who tried to kill her. we have new details from her would-be asass sin's sentencing hearing today. but not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like no other... inspired by a place like no other. introducing the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ [ male announcer ] it's that time of year. time for campbell's green bean casserole. you'll find the recipe at campbellskitchen.com. ♪ campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. 100% new. 100% mmm... wow, that is mmm... it's so mmm you might not believe it's a hundred calories. new yoplait greek 100. it is so good. >>> impo
now. >> election not on c-span. live coverage of president obama in chicago and mitt romney in boston. and your reaction, by phone, e- mail, facebook and twitter. look for live coverage beginning at 8:00 p.m. eastern. "washington journal" continues. joining us is fred sainz, of the human rights campaign. why is the same sex ballot important? guest: marriage equality has never won at the ballot box. we have four races across the country. we stand a good chance for marriage equality to really be a firm -- affirmed by voters and our country for the first time in history. as a very important one for committed and loving gay and lesbian couples across the country that want nothing more than the freedom to marry. host: what states are involved? guest: the state of washington, maryland and maine. and in minnesota we are fighting a constitutional amendment that would prohibit marriage equality. legislature is in both of those states, they passed a law into effect, and catholic governors in both of those states signed those bills, both of those states have laws that allow citizens to go and re
in the "washington post," "the boston globe," slate, the beirut daily star, san francisco magazine, "mother jones," and many, many others. eventually mr. jim and document a spectator and the daily car will be joining us and when he does i will give him a proper introduction. would the gentleman i have a right now i think a good way to get started, so those are three different perspectives, too represented here now, these are for philosophies in the midst of a campaign season, we are left and right and whatever is in between but i suppose that might be libertarian, dictator or influence on this election are outlined the american body politic. i think we should start with you individuals describing what it means to be a liberal. we will start with mr. scher. >> thanks very much for doing this. thank you for having us here. i've always defined liberalism very simply. the three r.'s of government. a government that is representative of all the people, that is responsive to the peoples concerned and is responsible of managing our resources both financial and natural. and that to me is the kind of gove
before a crowd of his own supporters, that were gathered outside his campaign headquarters in boston. >> i have just called president obama to congratulate him on his victory, his supporters and his campaign also deserve congratulations. i wish all of them well. but particularly the president, the first lady and their daughters. this is a time of great challenges for america. and i pray that the president will be successful in guiding our nation. >> paul ryan will return to washington, not as the next vice-president. but he did win re-election to the congressional seat he has held since 1998. >> the g.o.p. will remain in control of the house of representatives, the democrats failing to gets close to the 218 seats needed for a majority. the house speaker john boehner, obviously very pleased to retain his leadership role. >> for two years, our house majority has been the primary line of defense for the american people against a government that spends too much, taxes too much, certainly borrows too much, when it's left unchecked. and in the face of a staggering national debt that threat
and a columnist with "the boston herald", and julie roginsky, former political adviser to frank lautenberg and a fox news contributor. so the washington times comes out with an editorial that says he has no mandate. they say that he is, pointed out that he's the first president since george washington to be reelected with fewer popular votes than he was in the first term and say he's got no mandate. michael, true? >> uh, it's hard to see the mandate of a campaign that seemed to be focused almost entirely on whether or not the republicans were going to break into your home and steal your feminine hygiene products. so i can't really say he ran on this plan to do x, he's going to get it. but i don't think that means he's a lame duck. he has the power of the presidency, it's a very powerful tool. he's got the media, obviously, very cooperative. so let's just say he's a limping duck might be a better answer. megyn: is -- julie, your thoughts. because the point of the editorial is they say he was limping along already and that generally in the second terms presidents don't, you know, their power
is in chicago, and mitt romney in boston. we'll focus on the more competitive senate seats and taking reaction throughout the night by phone, e-mail, facebook, and twitter with live coverage beginning at eight eastern on c-span c-span radio, and c-span.org. >> when i watch c-span, i like the morning journal, the give and take there, the balanced approach, and i also like to hear the callers. never called myself, but i like hearing the callers. some of them are unusual to say the least, others thought provoking. c-span is everywhere. in washington, every event, you know, small hearings, public policy meeting downtown, c-span just seems to be there. >> steve austin watching c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979 brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >>> up next, former presidential candidate ralph nader on his book "17 solutions: bold ideas for america's future" looking at the political and cosh -- landscape and issues facing the country. the independent candidate for president in 2004 and 2008 discusses tax reform, the reduction of the
with of the boston does is something like he said. -- but the filibuster does is something like you said. a call the pathway to -- host: the pathway to 60 includes an independent from the state of maine who has not said what party he will caucus with. guest: i think it is a good bet he will sit with the democrats. one of our reporters spoke to harry reid, and he called angus who i do not think will stay for awhile. the republicans went after anxious -- angus king and the democrats did not endorse. they attack the republicans, but they did not endorse. i think basically harry reid is confident he will be sitting on their side of the aisle. host: mike, new york, democratic caller. caller: i wanted to focus in on three things i believe the democrats as well as the republicans should do that would move lower country forward. let's start with the republicans -- our country forward. let's start with the republicans. i was there with the perspective of not being mean-spirited. we know it is not going to happen 100%. the republicans think they have good ideas in terms of balancing the budget. if they we
wednesday afternoon in boston. he and ann romney both thanking the staff at large for their service and for giving up so much of their lives. i can also tell you, in conversation with romney aides in the last few hours, he's been helping some of those staffers find new jobs. >> tell me about what happened with the credit cards. i heard from you or read somewhere there was a bit of a rude awakening just a few hours after the campaign ended. >> right. just another example of how quickly these campaigns, which take so lock to ramp up, start to shut down. a number of romney aides told me on wednesday in the wee hours of the morning, a lot of these folks staying late to clean up and tear down the set, just even getting out of their cabs on their way back home early wednesday morning found their romney campaign credit cards had been shut off. i tried to call a staffer in florida on wednesday and her cell phone had already been shut down and disconnected. these things wind down extremely quickly. >> it was a campaign that was trumpeting fiscal conservatism. if you're fiscally conservative,
. but then as they started getting the information into orca, this data mining thing that they had going in boston, it was way off. >> brian: i've always said don't trust models. >> gretchen: we've gone from domino to heating studios to orca? >> steve: it's the name of their computer. they started noticing embossed with orca on election day that while their turnout was good, the other side's turnout was much better. that is why they lost the election. >> gretchen: let's do some other headlines for you now for tuesday. you probably seen his name hundreds of times on your computer screen. but the founder of the world's most famous antivirus company, john mcafee wanted for murder. police in belize want to question him about the shooting death his neighbor. the two had been at odds after fall filed a complaint against mcafe, for firing guns. it's said he was arrested on gun charges. >>> he wanted to blow up the home of former president george w. bush. in a few hours, he could be locked up for the rest of his life. a judge will sentence the saudi man in a texas courtroom today. a jury convicted him in
headquarters in boston. wendell goler live in chicago where president obama arrived a little while ago. phil keating is in florida with a lot going on down there. let's start with john since romney will be the first to cast his ballot today. >> that will be in massachusetts in an hour and 45 minutes. for the romney campaign, it's all about getting out the vote. when you look at the 11 swing states, he only leads in two. the others are all within the margin of error. he's going to hit the trail again today, going to the vote center in cleveland later on this morning. this afternoon, another in pittsburgh. paul ryan will be in richmond and also join the governor in cleveland. the governor was sitting around in the tarmac yesterday, according to an advisor saying, i don't want to sit in a hotel room all day on election day. let's go out and do what we can to muster every last vote. when you look at the early voting, it's advantage obama right now. governor romney really has to rack up the count on his side of things. yesterday in columbus urging his supporters at a rally to get out there and ge
] guest: right now with of the boston does is something like he said. -- but the filibuster does is something like you said. a call the pathway to -- host: the pathway to 60 includes an independent from the state of maine who has not said what party he will caucus with. guest: i think it is a good bet he will sit with the democrats. one of our reporters spoke to harry reid, and he called angus king, who i do not think will stay for awhile. the republicans went after anxious -- angus king and the democrats did not endorse. they attack the republicans, but they did not endorse. i think basically harry reid is confident he will be sitting on their side of the aisle. host: mike, new york, democratic caller. caller: i wanted to focus in on three things i believe the democrats as well as the republicans should do that would move lower country forward. let's start with the republicans -- our country forward. let's start with the republicans. i was there with the perspective of not being mean- spirited. we know it is not going to happen 100%. the republicans think they have good ideas in
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)